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5 Surprisingly Healthy Foods

Many foods that do in fact offer nutritional benefits have gotten a bad reputation over the years. Learn about the positive components of corn oil, cialis canada white potatoes, generic viagra beer, pork tenderloin and coffee. As with all foods- moderation and varitey is key!

1. Corn Oil- We hear a lot about the health benefits of olive oil and canola oil- but what about some of the other oils on the shelf? Corn oil is actually one of the richest natural sources of plant sterols which have been proven to lower cholesterol. Plant sterols are naturally occurring in plant foods and they block the body’s absorption of LDL cholesterol. Mazola corn oil has more plant sterols than any other cooking oil- with 4x as many sterols as olive oil and 40% more sterols than canola oil. Include a variety of unsaturated cooking oils and always remember-portion control. Visit SetaHealthierTable.com and make a pledge to WomenHeart- the largest educational organization towards women’s heart health. For every pledge made Mazola with donate $1 (up to $50,000) to encourage women to be screened for cholesterol and help fund heart disease education and patient advocacy programs. (sponsored by Mazola)

2. Potatoes– Yes- even the white potato is extremely healthy and has been getting a bad rap for both adults and children. A medium potato has only 128 calories, is a great source of vitamin C, and has twice as much potassium as a banana. Foods rich in potassium can reduce risk of high blood pressure and stroke. Also a good source of fiber and magnesium. According to the CDC (NHANES) on average school-aged children consume less than 1% of their daily calories from white potatoes, including oven baked potato fries.

3. Beer- studies evaluating the relative benefits of wine versus beer versus spirits suggest that moderate consumption of any alcoholic beverage is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease. There may be a small increase in HDL cholesterol. From a nutritional standpoint, beer contains a variety of B vitamins- such as folate. The key is to define moderation (1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men) and also understand consumption patterns associated with high risk. Beer also has been linked to greater bone density in post menopausal women according to a study in the Am J Clin Nutrition. Beer has high levels of an ingredient- silicon- which helps absorption of calcium and minerals to make strong bones. Beers containing high levels of malted barley and hops are richest in silicon.

4. Pork- The tenderloin is the leanest cut of pork – a 3-ounce serving contains 120 calories and 2.98 grams of total fat. It is as lean as a skinless chicken breast. It happens to be one of the richest sources of B-vitamins- niacin and thiamin- which are critical to carbohydrate metabolism. It is also rich in phosphorus, potassium, and zinc.

Nutrient % Daily Value (DV)* Why It’s Good For You
Iron 5% Getting enough iron is a problem for some women, especially women of child-bearing age. Heme iron (found in meat) is absorbed more readily than nonheme iron (found in plant-based foods). Thus, anyone who avoids meat without the help of their health professional may increase their risk of iron-deficiency anemia.
Magnesium 6% Important for the normal function of many enzymes (catalysts for the body’s chemical reactors), glucose and muscle action.
Phosphorous 20% Strengthens bones and generates energy in cells.
Potassium 11% This mineral, also known as an electrolyte, plays a major role in water balance and helps maintain normal blood pressure.
Zinc 14% A component of more than 70 enzymes, zinc is a key player in energy metabolism and the immune system.
Thiamin 54% Without this key vitamin, metabolism of carbohydrate, protein and fat would be significantly compromised. Animal protein is one of the best sources of this nutrient, and among the choices, pork is tops.
Riboflavin 19% Next to milk, there are few foods that have as much riboflavin per serving as pork. Riboflavin has an important role in the release of energy from foods.
Niacin 37% Important for the normal function of many enzymes in the body and involved in the metabolism of sugars and fatty acids.
Vitamin B12 8% Helps build red blood cells and metabolize carbohydrates and fats.
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) 37% Important for the normal function of enzymes and co-enzymes, which are needed to metabolize protein, carbohydrates and fats. Plus, it plays a critical role in the regulation of glycogen (stored carbohydrates) metabolism.

 

5. Coffee– contains high levels of antioxidants and the caffeine can help with alertness. It is linked to reduced risk of Parkinson’s in men; decreased memory loss, dementia and Alzheimer’s  (the antioxidants may prevent damage to brain cells); reduced risk of type II DM- may be do to chlorogenic acid in coffee. Most benefits are associated with drinking 2 to 4 (8-ounce) cups a day.

 
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Tips for Easy Meal Prep

10 Tips To Make Meal Prep Easier | BeachbodyBlog.com

Meal preppers love to quote time management expert Alan Lakein’s famous motto: “Failing to plan is planning to fail.” But, be honest. How many times have you finished work and thought, “I’m too tired to cook and there’s nothing in the fridge. I just I’ll hit the drive-thru”? By planning and prepping, you can help prevent that from happening. And, once you get the hang of it, you’ll be amazed how much time and money you might save. You might even start to see faster results because you’re not getting fries with that.

 

Use these 10 tips to make meal prep easier and faster:

 

1. Make a Plan
Make a list of your favorite healthy foods, choose simple recipes that can be made quickly or in bulk, and decide what you’ll eat for every snack and meal. This step will get easier and faster with practice. If you’re following the 21 Day Fix or want to use its simple approach, you can download its meal planning tools here.
Pro Tip: Save your plan for a future week. Once you have a few meal prep menus in your arsenal, you can rotate them to keep things interesting.
Meal Prep by Shiftingworkbalance

 

2. Stick to Your Grocery List
Don’t let junk food sneak into your shopping cart. Not having it in the house means not having to use your willpower to avoid it. Want to make an impulse purchase? If you can find a way to fit it into your eating plan for the week, go for it. Just keep these to a minimum so nothing goes to waste. By sticking to your list and by minimizing the impulse buys, you’ll help yourself save money.
Meal prep by @erindanaemackie

 

3. Don’t Forget About Shakeology
Especially if you feel like you’re short on fruits and veggies, this is one healthy snack taken care of!
Photo by allietonzifitness

 

4. Keep Snacks Simple
When you’re cooking everything for the week at once, it’s important to keep things simple. Save time by choosing snacks that don’t require a lot of time to put together. Fresh fruit, hard-boiled eggs, and pre-cut veggies with prepared hummus are great choices. Here are 55 snacks under 150 calories.
Meal prep by unique_bites

 

5. Cook Foods All At Once
Roasting vegetables, sweet potatoes, and even chicken breasts all at once will save you time, and cut down on your utility bill. Imagine…all of your side dishes for the week…ready in about 30 minutes!
Meal Prep by @onehungrymami

 

6. Look for Shortcuts
Buy pre-cut veggies and fruits, cooked lentils, or rotisserie chicken. Tuna is an an easy no-cook protein to add to salads or snacks. Already have your oven on to roast veggies? Why not try this tip for cooking a dozen eggs at once from @choose_you_fitness? Preheat your oven to 325°, then put your eggs in a muffin tin and bake them for 30 minutes. Then carefully remove them and plunge the eggs into a bowl of ice water until cool. Prefer the standard method? Here’s our approach to perfect hard-boiled eggs.
Meal prep by choose you fitness

 

7. Get on the Mason Jar Salad Bandwagon
Mason jar salads are the darlings of Pinterest and Instagram because they’re pretty, but they’re also very practical. They cost about a dollar a piece, are microwave safe (just remember to remove the lid), and can be used for so many different types of meals. Their vertical shape makes them especially nice for storing salads. Since the dressing is at the bottom of the jar, and the greens are at the top, nothing gets soggy! Here are some simple Mason jar salad recipes to get you started.
Meal prep by applewood_garden

 

8. Mix Things Up
It can be tempting to just eat the same meals every day, but you’ll eventually get bored. Meal prep master Amanda Meixner recommends at least two lunch options and two dinner options. This can be as simple as choosing different proteins for your salads each day, or eating chicken with vegetables three nights of the week, and fish or tofu with vegetables the other two. Once you get the hang of it you can get more creative with your recipes.
Meal prep by meowmeix

 

9. Invest in Food Storage Containers
A small investment in food containers of various sizes to suit your needs will make a world of difference. It’s a good idea to choose one container type and buy several that stack and store neatly. If you choose plastic containers, make sure they are BPA-free and that they won’t melt in the microwave or dishwasher. Sturdy Pyrex dishes with lids are also great as are Mason jars. If you decide to go all-in on the meal prep lifestyle, you might want to think about getting an insulated bag to carry your meals everywhere you go.
Meal prep by michaela_brittany

 

10. Keep Your Eyes on the Prize
All of this meal prep is for a purpose…to help you reach your health and fitness goals. When clean eating is as simple as reaching into the fridge for your lunch or dinner, you’ll be less tempted to stop for fast food or order takeout. Whether you do your meal prep for the week all ahead of time or just a few days at a time, doing so will help you stick to your meal plan and give you even more time to Push Play!
Meal prep by teresatrevinofitness

 

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7 Indispensable Meal-Prep Secrets You Need To Know

In your dream world—you know, the one you where you quit your job and never have errands to run—you’d cook all your own meals. You’d never pick up jelly doughnuts on the way to work, eat that overpriced lunch salad that doesn’t even taste good, or order pizza because you’re too stressed to even think about dinner.

It’s time to turn dream into reality. And all you need are two powerful, life-changing little words: meal prep. Essentially, it’s the practice of spending a few hours each week making huge batches of whole grains, proteins, veggies, and snacks, ensuring that you’re prepared to fight fast-food temptation with tasty, clean, home-cooked meals all week long. (Lose up to 15 pounds WITHOUT dieting with Eat Clean to Get Lean, our 21-day clean-eating meal plan.)

You’ve probably seen it sweeping across social networks—and you definitely want to try it. How should you get started? We spoke with three meal-prepping pros for these 7 must-know starter secrets to homemade meals all week.

 

meal prep
1. Keep it simple.
The biggest mental hurdle of meal prep: what to actually make. Meal prepping is already complex enough, so there’s no need to complicate matters with culinary wizardry, says Sean Peters, the meal-prep master behind the blog My Body My Kitchen. Using recipes that require a trip to a separate grocery store or time poring over a cookbook will only make you less likely to stick with your meal-prep plan. (Check out what the perfect day of clean eating looks like to help you get started.) Instead, opt for the simplest of dishes. To help you, we’ve included a list of ideas at the end of this article.

 

meal prep
2. Start with what you hate.
Always pick up breakfast on the way to work? Never have enough energy to make dinner after a long day? Your problem meal should be the one you always prep, according to Tammy Kresge of Organize Yourself Skinny. Dedicating your prep time to the meal you’re least likely to cook during the week will actually make a dent in your expensive, unhealthy takeout consumption.

 

mason jar meals
3. Do whatever you can.
Just because you don’t have to time to prep every meal each day of the week doesn’t mean you should throw your hands up and skip meal prep altogether. When time is limited, Kresge recommends putting together a few mason jar salads.

 

meal prep ideas

4. Divide and conquer.
Many meal-prep pros do all their work on one day of the week, usually Sundays. But there’s no law mandating that you need to do this, too, Peters says. “If you’re getting into meal prep, you can become overwhelmed with trying to prep all meals in one session, so consider breaking it into two sessions,” he says. For example, cook rice and chicken (see how to easily poach a chicken here) on Saturday afternoon, then tackle roasted veggies or salad on Sunday. The most important thing is to find a schedule you’ll actually stick to, even if it means prepping more than one day per week.
meal prep
5. Keep yourself interested.
The biggest downside of meal prep, of course, is eating the exact same meal multiple days in a row. But there are ways to make sure you don’t get bummed out by meal boredom, says Peters. Set aside one day in the middle of the week to cook something different than your prepped meals or consider earmarking one night per week as the day you eat out (bonus points for a restaurant you’ve never tried). Another trick: Roast five different types of chopped veggies during your meal prep session and eat a different one each day of the week.

 

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6. Master multitasking.
If you’re new to meal prep, your instinct may be to work on one recipe at a time: baked potatoes, then quinoa, then salmon, then snacks. While that’s very logical and organized, it’s also very time consuming. Instead, try to use multiple parts of your kitchen at once. “I almost always have something baking in the oven, something cooking on the stove, something in the slow cooker, and I’m working on something at the counter all at the same time,” says Lindsay Livingston, RD, author of the blog The Lean Green Bean. “This allows you to get more done in a shorter period of time.”

 

 

meal prep
7. Pick your MVPs.
After you have a few weeks of meal prep under your belt, identify a few dishes as your weekly staples, says Livingston. (For her, it’s Quinoa Breakfast Bars, Sweet Potato Bites, hard-boiled eggs, and carrot sticks.) “Prepping staples that I’ve made 100 times makes my time in the kitchen less stressful,” she says. Plus, once you’ve got some go-tos on lockdown, it’ll be easier to branch out and add variety with new recipes.

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